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Specialists in Fractional IT Director Services for SME organisations 
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Blog Articles 
Welcome to the Green Giant blog where we'll be sharing our insights and advice to help your business grow. 
 
 
Lots of directors in small or medium-sized firms decide to take on loads of jobs all at the same time. You look after the general business operations, you’re handling the financial side of things, you’re in charge of procurement, IT - the list goes on! 
 
If this sounds like you, then you can proudly claim the role of a MHD or a Multi Hatted Director. 
 
It’s a stressful role that’s full of responsibilities, but many directors often find it is the only solution in their firm. If money is tight, then you don’t have the resources to hire people to take on all of these roles for you. So, it falls on your shoulders to handle everything to the best of your abilities. 
 
 
 
 
 
Are you an MHD in your organisation? 
 
What is an MHD you may ask? It is an acronym for a Multi Hatted Director. 
 
Effectively, it means that you’re covering lots of different roles within your enterprise. For example you look after Finance, Operations, Delivery etc. Does this sound like you? 
 
 
 
There are a lot of IT companies out there which like to take a one size fits all approach with their work. They don’t tailor their services to work best for the businesses they’re being hired by, instead of using the same methods and tools as they would use on any job. 
 
Here at Green Giant Consulting, we take a different path. Each of our projects is specifically built around the client it is being made for, ensuring that you can improve your competitiveness and meet the desired outcomes you’ve had for your IT. Why exactly do we believe that this is so important, though? 
 
 
 
When it comes to changing the approach your business takes to technology, it can be difficult to know where to start or what matters most of all. However, you need to be careful not to fall into the trap that many businesses do when setting about making these kinds of changes. 
 
It’s important to remember the limitations of technology and what it really takes to make successful changes and transitions to your business. A digital transformation is not just about technology, and that might sound strange at first, but we’ll clear it all up for you below. 
 
 
 
 
 
Whether you run a business, you’re a new employee, or you’ve been working for an organisation for several years, you may have come across people insinuating that they have used the same methods and relied on the same guidelines for an age. 
 
If you’re used to hearing the words ‘we’ve always done it like that,’ this is a surefire sign that it’s time for a change. Modern-day businesses face different challenges, and it’s essential to aim for continuous improvement. 
 
Resting on your laurels can cost your customers, affect your reputation and prevent you from competing with rivals. If you don’t progress, you could also be missing out on more efficient and cost-effective ways of working. 
 
 
 
Technology plays an invaluable and unavoidable role in every business operating in the world today. 
 
No matter the scale of the company in question, there are always going to be a range of technological aids and techniques which are being employed as a means of ensuring that the business operates smoothly. But because of the speed at which these things develop and change, you need to make sure that you are still doing things in the best, most appropriate way possible. 
 
That means changing your approaches, your skillset and your assumptions in the face of a more collaborative technological age. Let’s look at this in some detail. 
 
 
 
When it comes to project management, scheduling a review at every key stage you reach ensures your hard work is not for nothing. After all, most projects fail because they are not reviewed at regular review points throughout the lifecycle of the project. 
 
This is specifically important in the IT department. Working with technology can get expensive at the start of the business life cycle, and it’s important to input cost effective reviews to keep change from being impossible. From initial concept to delivery at key stages, any project your enterprise is working on should be reviewed, to ensure it is still on target to meet the objectives and the benefits that were identified at the beginning of the project. 
 
 
 
Every project is a challenge and throws up its own unique challenges and problems that have to be overcome. That’s why every project you complete gives you a chance to learn lessons that you can carry forward and use to your advantage on future projects. It’s something that’s so often missed by teams in all kinds of industries, but that can be changed.  
 
Here’s what you need to know about learning lessons from historical projects. 
 
 
 
An SME is only ever as successful as its own processes. After all, in many cases, your processes are all that separates you from your competitors. If you run a business, your USP isn’t necessarily what you do so much as how you do it. It’s your processes that provide the bare bones on which the customer or client experience is built.  
 
Carry on reading to learn more 
 
Do you ever feel like you can’t see the wood for the trees? Does the fate of your business ever feel like it’s been left to the whims of chance? Do you ever feel like, no matter how hard you try to maintain control of your business’ operations, marketing strategy and cash flow, you’re sitting atop a bucking bronco waiting for the inevitable moment when it throws you loose? 
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